How To Stay In Touch With Friends & Family While RV Traveling

Welcome to our How-To Series. In this video series, we will explain the many how-tos of Airstream Living. From full-time RVing, to travel, to living in a tiny space we will share what we have learned from living this lifestyle. We encourage you to comment below with your own advice on this topic, as well as any other How-Tos you would like to see.

This week’s topic is How To Stay In Touch With Friends & Family While RV Traveling. Sometimes it can be hard to stay in touch with your loved ones while traveling. While phone calls & Skype calls are awesome your friends may not call you because they worry you’ll be busy (which I find funny since we actually have more time now then we did before we were traveling). So scheduling phone calls works great! There is also email, Facebook, Instagram and other social media as well. Finally one of the major positives of a traveling life, for us, is being able to visit friends and family we would otherwise not see. So schedule a vacation with family! Visit a friend who has moved away. It’s worth it!

Want to meet up? Chat with us? Join our Facebook group! 

 

Tuesday Talk – What Is It Like Being Back in Tucson After 7 Months on the Road?

This week we are discussing what it’s like being back in Tucson. Yesterday we discussed why we love being stationary again but today is all about Tucson. We’re back here because Courtney is working this winter BUT even without that, we would be back. Tucson is a great city, especially in the winter! We explain why.

Want to meet up? Chat with us? Join our Facebook group! 

On Tuesday’s we’d like to answer questions sent to us from viewer’s like you and share some of the details of our Airstream life. If you have a question for us please let us know in the comments below or at our website astreaminlife.com

 

How To Store & Do Laundry While Full Time RVing

Welcome to our How-To Series. In this video series, we will explain the many how-tos of Airstream Living. From full-time RVing, to travel, to living in a tiny space we will share what we have learned from living this lifestyle. We encourage you to comment below with your own advice on this topic, as well as any other How-Tos you would like to see.

This week’s topic is How To Store & Do Laundry While Full Time RVing. We have shown in the past how to store an entire wardrobe in your Airstream or RV but what happens when those clothes get dirty? The first thing you have to do is store the dirty laundry. You can do this with a hamper in a closet, the shower, a drawer, or under the bed. We choose to store our dirty laundry in an ottoman in our living area. We think it’s the perfect solution!

Now how do we do that laundry when we are traveling? You can choose to go to a campground with laundry facilities, find a laundromat or go hang out with friends and family. Some RVers even store portable washer/dryers in order to wash clothes at other times as well. Of course, if your rig has a washer/dryer then you are all set!

Want to meet up? Chat with us? Join our Facebook group! 

 

How To Be The Best RV Co-Pilot

Welcome to our How-To Series. In this video series, we will explain the many how-tos of Airstream Living. From full-time RVing, to travel, to living in a tiny space we will share what we have learned from living this lifestyle. We encourage you to comment below with your own advice on this topic, as well as any other How-Tos you would like to see.

This week’s topic is How To Be The Best RV Co-Pilot. If you missed it last week, make sure to check out How to Be the Best RV Driver.

If you are lucky enough to have an RV Co-Pilot and the Driver doesn’t have to do all of these things themselves these are the roles we think an RV Co-Pilot should take on. Number 1 the RV Co-Pilot should be the planner. They should plan or help plan the route and keep track of all the stops along the way including gas stations and rest-stops. They should also be aware at all times so they can support the Driver who is trying to get them wherever they are going safely. This means anticipating the Driver’s needs and staying alert to help in any unexpected situations. Lastly, a good RV Co-Pilot is often the spotter as well at campgrounds or in tight gas stations. They get out of the rig and help the Driver maneuver when necessary.

 

How To Be The Best RV Driver

Welcome to our How-To Series. In this video series, we will explain the many how-tos of Airstream Living. From full-time RVing, to travel, to living in a tiny space we will share what we have learned from living this lifestyle. We encourage you to comment below with your own advice on this topic, as well as any other How-Tos you would like to see.

This week’s topic is How To Be The Best RV Driver. We’ve been towing our Airstream behind us for quite a while now and Steve thought he should talk about some of the things he’s learned. Next week we’ll get Courtney’s take on being the Best RV Co-Pilot.

Steve’s first recommendation is to remember you are not in a car. You have different reactions times and requirements driving an RV. You need to make sure you leave more than enough room between you and the person in front of you in case they stop short (since it will take you longer to stop) but also in case someone cuts you off. Someone will cut you off. Don’t take it personally. People often see an RV and immediately want to get around it because they fear it will be slow. There is not much you can do about that.

You also need to remember that while driving an RV you may not be going the speed limit, especially on 75mph highways. If you need to stay in the right lane and go the speed you are comfortable with. If you are going with the speed of the traffic than we recommend the center lane (if there are 3 lanes) since you don’t have to worry about people merging in from the right.

You may want to consider what roads you will feel the most comfortable on. While scenic roads are nice to drive in a car, highways can be easier while driving an RV. The time of day you drive is also something to consider. Try to avoid rush hour and perhaps driving at night is something that would work for you?

Lastly, if you have a co-pilot make sure to be upfront about expectations. They are there to help you keep your eyes and mind on the road. Also be sure to check out your route beforehand so you don’t have any unexpected surprises while going 60 mph.

Practice Makes Perfect. Remember that above all else!

 

How To Plan The Best Driving Route For Your RV

Welcome to our How-To Series. In this video series, we will explain the many how-tos of Airstream Living. From full-time RVing, to travel, to living in a tiny space we will share what we have learned from living this lifestyle. We encourage you to comment below with your own advice on this topic, as well as any other How-Tos you would like to see.

This week’s topic is How To Plan The Best Driving Route For Your RV or Airstream. The first step in planning your route is figuring out your starting point and ending point. We try to limit our travel days to about 3 hours and plan accordingly. Meanwhile, remember that when driving an RV you tend not to go the speed limit on some roads, therefore make sure to expand your time estimate based on this.

The second step is using a GPS or map to figure out your route. We use Google Maps to start. Once we see the route it plans we check AllStays to ensure that the route looks good in terms of road restrictions, low bridges, and road grades. We will also google the route if it looks particularly curvy or we have any questions. In general truck routes are okay.

Once we have the route planned we use AllStays and the RestStops app to find our planned stops along that route. We aim for 1 stop every 1-2 hours depending on how we are feeling. Not all Rest stops have truck parking so make sure to check ahead. If we need to find diesel on our route we will use AllStays to find gas stations with RV lanes or at least truck parking and an RV dump (this implies they are big rig friendly). If we don’t have the Airstream attached we use GasBuddy to find the best prices.

A last note, remember to plan WHEN you are going too. Avoiding rush hour in cities when you are able makes for a much nicer driving day.

This week’s links:
Google Maps
AllStays
Rest Stops App
Gas Buddy

 

Tuesday Talk – Maneuvering in Tight Spots with an Airstream or RV

This week we are answering a request by a viewer to talk about tips and tricks for maneuvering into a tight spot with our Airstream. Our number 1 tip is to practice. The very first thing we did when we picked up our Airstream was to find an empty parking lot on the way home and practice backing into spots. This was good for Steve to learn which way to turn the wheel in order to achieve certain results. It was also good for Courtney to understand how much time she needs to give Steve to have the turn completed correctly. Even with this practice we still made plenty of mistakes once we hit the road.

Remember to get out and look at the spot you are pulling into. Check for trees, rocks, where to power outlets are etc. Figure out a plan of attack and discuss it with your partner. If you have a spotter like Steve has Courtney make sure to communicate hand signals etc so that you understand each other. Walk talkies can also help. The number one thing to remember when working together in tight spots is that neither person is trying to make the other look like a fool. Sometimes it gets very frustrating and embarrassing but you are both doing your best and stick with it. This has saved us from many a fight over frustration.

On Tuesday’s we’d like to answer questions sent to us from viewer’s like you and share some of the details of our Airstream life. If you have a question for us please let us know in the comments below or at our website astreaminlife.com

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How To Work Full Time In An RV While Traveling

Welcome to our How-To Series. In this video series, we will explain the many how-tos of Airstream Living. From full-time RVing, to travel, to living in a tiny space we will share what we have learned from living this lifestyle. We encourage you to comment below with your own advice on this topic, as well as any other How-Tos you would like to see.

This week’s topic is How To Work Full Time In An RV While Traveling. We will not be discussing how to find a mobile full-time job in this video, instead, we’ll talk about what you can do to make having a mobile job work from a traveling RV/Airstream.

The first major consideration is Internet since most mobile jobs will be internet dependent. We did a lot of research and decided to purchase a grandfathered Unlimited Verizon Plan from eBay. While this cost us money up front we now pay $70 for unlimited data. Once you have a way of getting internet while on the road the next step is camping where you have a signal. We use Campendium to find the best camping spots (both campgrounds and boondocking) with good Verizon signal so that we can stay connected. However, sometimes you can’t get the best signal. That is why we recommend a cell booster so that 1-2 bars 3G can be boosted up to 1-2 bars 4G. While it can’t make a signal from nothing it can certainly help make an unusable signal usable.

Once your internet requirements are out of the way the next things to think about are a comfortable workspace and a schedule. Steve worked full-time from the Airstream dinette for months but it was very comfortable or conducive to a good workday. So we tore it out and put in a nice desk with plenty of room for his laptops and monitor. We also got him a comfortable work chair. All this has made his workday better. A schedule is also a big issue with working from home, especially when traveling. We recommend trying to set up a schedule that works for you and your lifestyle (if it’s not already set by your company) and sticking to it as best you can.

This week’s links:
Our Unlimited Data Plan
Campendium
Our Cell Booster
Our Desk Install

 

Tuesday Talk – Dealing with Campground Restrictions

This week we are discussing campground restrictions and whether we’ve ever had problems with them. We like to boondock as much as possible but sometimes we need to stay at commercial campgrounds. One thing to keep in mind with any campground is to look into their restrictions and rules. Some campgrounds have rules about the max age a rig can be, or a minimum age of someone in your party (55+ campgrounds) or how many dogs you can bring in, or even breed restrictions. We have luckily never had an issue with any campground we’ve stayed in but it’s important you understand the rules before booking a reservation! Have you ever had issues with a campground and specific restrictions?

On Tuesday’s we’d like to answer questions sent to us from viewer’s like you and share some of the details of our Airstream life. If you have a question for us please let us know in the comments below or at our website astreaminlife.com

 

How To Setup Camp At A Full Hookup Campground

Welcome to our How-To Series. In this video series, we will explain the many how-tos of Airstream Living. From full-time RVing, to travel, to living in a tiny space we will share what we have learned from living this lifestyle. We encourage you to comment below with your own advice on this topic, as well as any other How-Tos you would like to see.

This week’s topic is How To Setup Camp At A Full Hookup Campground. We’ve done a video about setting up camp while boondocking but thought we should show how to set up camp when we have full hookups as well. We apologize for any noise in this video, the campground is right by the highway. Once you check in at the front office of the campground and find your assigned spot the first step is pulling into the spot. You need to make sure that all your hoses and cords are going to reach to the water, sewer, and electric. You may also want to check that your door won’t hit a tree or that you can open any awnings you would like to.

Once your RV or Airstream is situated its time to level side to side using blocks and chock the other wheels to ensure you are secure. Then it’s time to unhitch if you have a travel trailer of 5th wheel. Now level front to back using the tongue jack. Now that the trailer is nice and level we can put the stabilizers down to keep it from feeling like we’re rocking side to side when walking around inside.

Now it’s time for the hookups. You can do these in any order but we prefer plugging into electric first, especially on hot days, to get the A/C going. So we plug-in electric, then water and the sewer. Lastly, it’s time to set up the fun stuff like the awnings, chairs, grills, etc.

This week’s links:
How to Setup Camp when Boondocking